Remembering Dr. Seuss

Samantha, whom I affectionately call “Sam-I-am,” after the character in the 1960 classic Green Eggs and Ham, by one of my favorite authors, told me that students are wearing black and red to school today in honor of Dr. Seuss.
In pursuit of the poetry that has often eluded me, and to help Samantha know just what is possible, this poem is dedicated to her – and to children everywhere who struggle to make the most of what they have, even when what they have isn’t much.
It’s my personal take on that great inspirational book, Oh, the Places You’ll Go!, with my sincerest apologies to Theodor Seuss Geisel (and my beloved Professor Sherman)!
My Seussism
When life gets too scary
to face on your own,
just try to remember
you’re never alone.
If hiccups and walnuts
and things quite absurd,
get in your way, why,
just try to be self-assured.
Your thoughts and ideas
will serve you so well,
that everyone who sees you
won’t even be able to tell…
That when you’re grinning
with head held up high,
inside you’re quaking,
ready to die.
So in the long run
hang on for the ride.
Grab everything life offers,
even if it’s not all pie!

No Liars Allowed

Last October, Chris talked nonstop about this book she spent an entire weekend reading. Now Chris, a mother of three, holds down a job, plus she has a really hectic schedule at home, but this book caught her attention and held it, until she turned the very last page.
I thought the story sounded pretty amazing, and considered reading it myself. The book? James Frey’s A Million Little Pieces, which was recently exposed as less than the memoir that it apparently isn’t.
Chris has since said she feels betrayed. “I lived his life,” she said, when she heard reports of Frey’s misdeeds from The Smoking Gun. (Take a number, Chris.)
My thoughts returned to a literary event I attended last November in Pittsburgh, Pa., when the author who blazed the trail for current memoirists spoke about her craft. Mary Karr, of The Liars’ Club fame, was definite in her conviction about what a memoirist does – or doesn’t – do.
“Don’t make (crap) up. Don’t make (crap) up. Just don’t,” Karr said. Twice, for emphasis.


Karr’s comment was made during a Q&A session after she spoke on what – thanks to Frey – is currently quite a hot topic: “Truth and Lies in Poetry and Memoir.” Karr was a guest lecturer at 412: Creative Nonfiction Festival, and her response was to someone who asked if it was all right to depart from the facts when writing his memoir. Then she told him if he wasn’t going to tell the truth, to market his book as fiction – not fact.
That and many other things Karr said could be helpful to Frey. I personally found Karr’s every word compelling, which was why so many of her comments have returned to me, following the fray over Frey’s book.
“If it’s working right at all, the truth will ambush you,” Karr said.
That’s something every writer of fact – whether a journalist, an essayist or a memoirist – might want to pause to consider. I began working on my memoir about the same time I went into professional journalism. It took me years to complete, but when I was finished, I could look back and realize that, if nothing else, it painted a candid picture of the truth. Sometimes I grimaced at the rawness exposed on its pages. Which may be one reason I haven’t been all that diligent in finding a publisher for it.
Or maybe it was another reason, which Karr also mentioned. “The memoir is the only window into a family that shows the complexity of growing up with people who will let your (butt) down and you will mostly eat Thanksgiving dinner with them.” Maybe, just maybe, those of us with real facts to relate worry about opening that window on our families.
In spite of that, memoirs that are well-written – and which make for good reading – are also complex. Maybe that’s the problem with Frey’s work. Its complexity seemed to prove that the truth is indeed stranger than fiction. Ah, if only that was the case for Frey.
“Memoirists take the events they inherit and attribute meaning to them,” Karr said. There is a difference between taking something you inherit and using it in a productive way, and taking something you inherit and ruining it. I think it’s like taking the good family silver Grandma Nora left, and using it as gardening tools for planning perennials.
Personally, I think Karr is right. A good memoirist gives meaning to the things in his, or her, life. That doesn’t include a license to deliberately change the memories, though. Doing that is what gives memoirs the bad press they are now getting, thanks to Frey.
“Memoir was seen as a low-rent, trash form,” Karr said, in reference to the time period when she wrote The Liar’s Club, adding that this is because “people mistrust the truth of it.”


As a journalist who has always ascribed to the truth, to the facts, to the integrity that’s supposed to be a hallmark of my profession, I think other purveyors of truth might want to take a lesson from that. Think back to 1980, when The Washington Post’s Janet Cooke made up not only the story itself, but even the little eight-year-old in it, when she wrote that he was a heroin addict. It wasn’t until the article won a Pulitzer Prize – which The Post had to return – that the real truth became known. That there was no such story, no such little boy.
Then there’s The Boston Globe’s former award-winning columnist, Patricia Smith, who resigned in June 1998, after admitting she made up quotes for her metro column. Or how about May 2003, when we learned that New York Times reporter Jayson Blair was forced to resign when authorities discovered he not only made up quotes, but he also fabricated entire interviews that never happened?
One of those interviews was supposedly with the father of Pfc. Jessica Lynch, the former POW from Palestine, W.Va., just an hour or so south of my Morgantown home. As a journalist, I would have given my eye teeth to interview Lynch or her family. To make up an interview, instead of actually going to Palestine to conduct it, just boggles this reporter’s sense of curiosity.
Speaking of curiosity, there was also Jack Kelley, who resigned in January 2004 after 21 years with USA Today. (An investigation later found that much of what he reported during his long career was fiction.)
All of these examples – the most recent being Frey – could signal cracks in a foundation with much deeper, more serious, structural flaws. Or they could just be a few bad apples. Whatever the case, each and every one of us who depends on the facts for our paycheck, have a more compelling reason to make sure we deliver the truth. Karr summed it up quite nicely.
“I want the reader to trust me,” she said.
So do I, Mary. So do I.
NOTE: For more information about ethics in journalism, see these articles:
“Ethically Challenged” by Lori Robertson
http://http://www.ajr.org/Article.asp?id=573
“We Mean Business” by Jill Rosen
http://www.ajr.org/Article.asp?id=3668
“The Perils of Press Arrogance” by David S. Broder
http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/A42231-2003Jun10?language=printer
“Stephen Glass: I Lied for Esteem” from CBS News, with Correspondent Steve Croft
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2003/05/07/60minutes/main552819.shtmlhttp://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2003/05/07/60minutes/main552819.shtml

About SOS: from Hilda Heady – rural health expert

“Daleen Berry captures her extraordinary personal journey from pain and bewilderment to resilience and peace. Sister of Silence honors women everywhere and especially, the resilience of rural women and their very human spirit. This is a very important book.”

Hilda R. Heady, MSW
Executive Director
West Virginia Rural Health Education Partnership

Hilda Heady is associate vice-president for Rural Health at the Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center of West Virginia University. She is appointed to the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission and she also works with the Vice Chancellor for Health Sciences. She serves as executive director of the West Virginia Rural Health Education Partnerships, which has received national acclaim in such publications as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Journal of Rural Health.

Ms. Heady has testified before Congress on various rural health issues. She was invited to the “Health Care Reform in Rural Areas” White House conference in 1993 and was a regional finalist for the 1997 White House Fellows program. Ms. Heady is a former VISTA volunteer, whose interest in rural health and community development has spanned more than 30 years.

* * * *

My next book, Guilt by Matrimony, about the murder of Aspen socialite, Nancy Pfister, comes out November 17. My memoir, Sister of Silence, is about surviving domestic violence and how journalism helped free me; Cheatin’ Ain’t Easy, now in ebook format, is about the life of Preston County native, Eloise Morgan Milne; The Savage Murder of Skylar Neese (a New York Times bestseller, with coauthor Geoff Fuller) and Pretty Little Killers (also with Fuller), released July 8, 2014, and featured in the August 18 issue of People Magazine.

You can find these books either online or in print at a bookstore near you, at BenBella Books, Nellie Bly Books, Amazon, on iTunes and Barnes and Noble.

For an in-depth look at the damaging effects of the silence that surrounds abuse, please watch my live TEDx talk, given April 13, 2013, at Connecticut College.

Have a great day and remember, it’s whatever you want to make it!

~Daleen

Editor’s Note: Daleen Berry is a New York Times best-selling author and a recipient of the Pearl Buck Award in Writing for Social Change. She has won several other awards, for investigative journalism and her weekly newspaper columns, and her memoir, Sister of Silence, placed first in the West Virginia Writers’ Competition. Ms. Berry speaks about overcoming abuse through awareness, empowerment and goal attainment at conferences around the country. To read an excerpt of her memoir, please go to the Sister of Silence site. Check out the five-star review from ForeWord Reviews. Or find out why Kirkus Reviews called Ms. Berry “an engaging writer, her style fluid and easy to read, with welcome touches of humor and sustained tension throughout.”

Vital phone numbers

If you need help…

If you are experiencing an emergency situation as a victim of domestic violence, child sexual abuse or rape, the first and quickest call you can make is 911. The local dispatcher who answers can get you the phone number for a local battered women’s shelter, the hospital, a police officer or even a counselor who can help you.

Please don’t let fear, embarrassment or shame stop you from making that call. It may just be the first step that changes your life!

Other agencies are listed below, with either a URL address or a phone number. Anyone at these numbers will be more than happy to listen to you and direct you to someone who can help, if they cannot personally do so themselves. If you are from another country, please check your phone book for the local equivalent to our emergency 911 system here in the United States.

National Contacts
National Domestic Violence Hotline
1-800-799-SAFE (7233) or TTY 1-800-787-3224
http://www.ndvh.org.
Rape, Abuse, Incest National Network (RAINN)
1-800-656-HOPE
http://www.rainn.org/counseling.html
National Sexual Assault Hotline
1-800-656-4673
(24 hours a day, 7 days a week)
West Virginia State Contact
West Virginia Coalition Against Domestic Violence
304-965-3552
http://www.wvcadv.org.
Morgantown, W.Va. Area Contact
Rape and Domestic Violence Information Center
Monongalia County: 304-292-5100
Preston County: 304-329-1687
Taylor County: 304-265-6534
www.rdvic.org.

For an agency in your state, or for other resources and information
http://www.feminist.org/911/crisis.html
Family Violence Prevention Fund
http://endabuse.org/
Journal of the American Women’s Medical Association
http://www.jamwa.org
National Online Resource Center on Violence Against Women
http://www.vawnet.org
To assess your level of danger:
http://www.dangerassessment.org
(This useful tool was developed by Dr. Jackie Campbell at Johns Hopkins University for use by health professionals).
NOTE: As time goes on, we will be adding more contact and/or resource information. If you know of an agency or phone number that should be listed, please submit it in a post on this site.

Telling Terry Goodbye

NOTE: A portion of this was broadcast on WVPB on January 10, the day family and friends buried Sago miner and Newburg resident Terry Helms.


When I went to bed just before 2 a.m. on January 4, I thought that 12 coal miners trapped beneath the earth in a town where I once worked as newspaper editor were alive. I did so with mixed emotions, for we knew one of the miners.

I had been on the phone with Courtney, my 22-year-old daughter, discussing the mining disaster and the rescue of 12 miners who were then said to be alive. I had called her just after midnight, elated by what I heard on a TV channel coming out of Pittsburgh.

“Did you hear the news?” I asked her.

She had heard, but I was surprised at the lack of emotion in her voice.

“Mom, did you hear that the one miner who died was Terry?”

I hadn’t.

She said Fox News carried an interview with a family member, who confirmed Terry Helms was the first miner they found earlier Tuesday night.

* * *

A lump stuck in my throat, as I thought about Terry’s daughter, Amber, who had competed on the Preston High track team with Courtney, both of them wearing braids in their hair and matching grins on their faces. I thought about his son, Nick, and how Courtney had once told me that all the girls would go gaga whenever he showed up at one of their track meets.

“He was Amber’s cool, big brother, and he was so cute!” She told me.

I also recalled the hundreds of times we drove past their house on Martin Hill, about five miles from our own.

Still connected to my daughter by phone, Courtney began talking about the man who never missed a track meet, who would tell her older sister, “Courtney has so much talent.” Terry would then say, during time spent talking on the bleachers, “We’re going to take her under our wing.” And that’s just what he did.

In spite of working long hours in the coal mines, and tending to other responsibilities, Terry’s children were so important, he made sure he was there for them. He was also there for other people’s children. “That’s the kind of person Terry was,” Courtney told me.

“Terry was the ultimate track dad,” she said. “If one of us girls needed something – like we forgot to take out an earring before our event began—Terry would keep it for us, and hold onto it until we were done.”

And now, Terry was dead. Gone. His poor family, I thought. What will they do? How will they cope, knowing that their loved one was the only one to die in that disaster?

* * *

When I woke up to a ringing phone a few hours later, it took a minute to get my bearings. The clock said it was 5 a.m. I heard Courtney’s voice on the line. “Mom, it was wrong. They got it wrong. They’re all dead. Only one miner survived.” For someone so young, she sounded so old. And tired. And sad.

I came awake immediately, understanding why the reporter’s blood that runs through my veins had given me reason to pause, when I first heard that 12 miners had been rescued. Watching the television, I wondered why a coal company official hadn’t released the news. I kept waiting for an official to step forward, to confirm it.

That’s what happens in big stories like these; there is an official release of information. At least, that’s what’s supposed to happen. But I, too, among the thousands of West Virginians who had waited with bated breath, for a miracle, turned off the television believing that Terry had been the only miner to die in the explosion. Thinking that, even in spite of losing Terry, we had gotten our miracle.

Discussing the whole affair with Cassandra afterward, we were both angered by what had happened. How terrible, we said, for families to be told their loved ones were alive only to later learn a terrible trick has been played on you.

* * *

Growing up in West Virginia, where coal has reigned as king for most of the state’s history, you learn at an early age that when it comes to coal mining, all is not always well. I learned that lesson while married to my childrens father, who would come home many nights, with yet another story about a roof fall, or a runaway piece of equipment, or a fellow miner being injured.

One of the most serious injuries I recall was the night he told me his coworker and driving buddy, J.R., had been crushed in a mining accident. After that, J.R. never worked in the mines again; his back and legs had received permanent damage from the injury.

My coal miner husband went from one mine to the next, in search of that elusive thing a miner will never find – a safe coal mine. There is no such thing. The very nature of the work is inherently dangerous. Going down below the ground, working in pitch black and wet conditions, while electrical wires are scattered about, and with long, iron rods known as roof bolts, used to hold up the mine ceiling, as well as the potential for methane gas, is anything but safe. In the 10 years we were married, if I didn’t learn anything else about coal mining, I learned that.

I can’t even count the times he came home after another 12-hour shift, cold to the bone and exhausted, telling me about the safety violations that were evident, but which were often hidden from the mine inspectors.

My concern was that my children’s father wouldn’t survive to see them grow up; his was just to get through another day alive.
I often wonder how much impact this fear had on our daughters, and what role it played in their decision to volunteer with the local emergency rescue crews.

“The last thing we wanted to hear was a dispatch to a coal mine, because it was always a rock fall, or someone was run over by a piece of equipment. If you got that call, you knew it was never going to be good,” Cassandra said.

* * *

Our Appalachian heritage teaches us the importance of living life on its own merit here in coal country. You take what you are given, and you roll with it. If life delivers you a punch in the gut, then you make the most of it.

That’s what we’ve done since January 2, when we first learned of the 13 miners who were trapped in a Tallmansville coal mine. When we first realized they might never make it out alive. When we learned, sometime two days later, that one actually did.

Just before we hung up the phone, Courtney asked me a question. “Mom, will you call me when you get up, and make sure I’m awake?”
I didn’t even feel the urge I usually have when she asks this of me, when I gently chide her about buying an alarm clock. “Sure thing. I love you,” I said instead.

* * *

Since this post was originally published, I have written four books. My memoir, Sister of Silence, is being used in colleges and some high schools; Cheatin’ Ain’t Easy, The Savage Murder of Skylar Neese, and Pretty Little Liars, due out in July 2013.

You can find these books either online or in print at a bookstore near you, at BenBella Books, Nellie Bly Books, Amazon, on iTunes and Barnes and Noble.

For an in-depth look at the damaging effects of silence, please watch my live TEDx talk, given April 13, 2013, at Connecticut College.

Have a great day and remember, it’s whatever you want to make it!

~Daleen

 

Editor’s Note: Daleen Berry is a New York Times best-selling author and the first recipient of the Pearl Buck Award in Writing for Social Change. She has won several other awards, for investigative journalism and her weekly newspaper columns, and Sister of Silence placed first in the West Virginia Writers’ Competition. Ms. Berry speaks about overcoming abuse through awareness, empowerment and goal attainment at conferences around the country. To read an excerpt of her memoir, please go to the Sister of Silence site. Check out the five-star review from ForeWord Reviews. Or find out why Kirkus Reviews called Ms. Berry “an engaging writer, her style fluid and easy to read, with welcome touches of humor and sustained tension throughout.”

Bedtime Blues

NOTE: The following Vintage Berry Wine never appeared in print; this is the original publication. However, it really did happen, on any given night of the week, between the years 1990-98.
For years I had the same problem. It didn’t matter if I was married or single, although it has gotten worse since I began tucking the kids in alone, but bedtime is a real chore around my house. It is the one thing I think I dread more than anything else.
My kids, as with most children I know, have something I do not – limitless energy. In fact, their energy levels peak around, oh, 8 p.m. That’s when they’re supposed to be taking their baths. Instead, I will find them bouncing off the walls (and each other), or chasing a sibling around the house. It takes me at least 15 minutes to persuade them that taking a bath really does have some health advantages – in addition to being a good habit to get into. Then they hop in the tub and I leave the room, with strict instructions that bath time is 15 minutes ONLY.


Continue reading “Bedtime Blues”

Same old column – new format

Welcome back … to Vintage Berry Wine!
After 15 long years, it is returning in a new and more modern format – online, for the world to see. Born in 1987 in Preston County, West Virginia, during my first job as a newspaper reporter, “Vintage Berry Wine” was my weekly column, about the humorous antics of my (then!) four small children. At times, space was also devoted to discussion of personal topics, such as divorce, single parenting, love the second time around, and mental illness.
Weekly readers used to say they couldn’t wait to receive each new issue of the Preston County News, and often told me it was the first thing they read upon opening their newspaper. While the column stopped after I left in 1991, many loyal fans of Vintage Berry Wine would stop me (or my family) on the street, to ask when publication would resume.
That didn’t happen, but the original weekly column was briefly reborn in 1997, when I went to work for The Dominion Post, a daily newspaper in Morgantown, W.Va. There it was called “In the Out Door” and readers’ responses were just as enthusiastic. A relocation to California ended that column’s brief stint, and it has been waiting for a resurrection of sorts ever since.
In time, I plan to publish some of the original Vintage Berry Wine columns here. In the meantime, this new Vintage Berry Wine is dedicated to two people: Charles, my first grandson, and Jane Stewart, a loyal reader, wherever she is. Charles was born in 2003, and is already a heartbreaker – he broke mine the first time I held him!
Thank you for believing in me, Jane. Your faith and that of many other loved ones have sustained my writing efforts during all these years. I hope you find this new format, and that you will let me know how you like it.

Sister Of Silence: A Memoir

Sister Of Silence is truly an inspirational account of one woman whose indomitable spirit led her on a journey to self-discovery and empowerment, where she refused to be silenced.

This memoir tells the story of one abused woman who nearly reached the point of no return, while exploring one of the largest epidemics of our time in a manner that is, by turns, both calmly detached and full of gritty emotion. Sister Of Silence looks at the heartrending reasons why some women choose suicide or even murder as a way out … but then shows how such deadly thoughts can be overcome.

Sister Of Silence is the first book of its kind, written by an award-winning journalist and columnist who is daring enough to reveal how she arrived at that point of no return. More important, it explores how she found the strength to walk away, and ultimately turned her life around in the process.

The most recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states that about 1.5 million women are raped or physically assaulted each year by someone who is supposed to love them (an intimate partner). In addition, this violence results in 1,300 deaths annually, as well as two million injuries. Indeed, experts say10-14 percent of married women in this country are raped by their husbands.

But since most violence against women goes unreported, experts say from 960,000 to 4 million women are physically assaulted by men they know and love each year in the United States. And the FBI reports that in 2006, 32-percent of female murder victims were killed by their husbands or boyfriends. Sister Of Silence takes a hard look at how many of these women end up in such tragic situations, by fearlessly exploring where one of these women came from, and showing how other women can be set free from their silence.

In this gripping memoir, Berry lets readers take a candid look into her teenage years in Appalachia, where she grew up among the coal fields of West Virginia. Pregnant at sixteen and later married off to her unborn child’s father, she was suicidal by age twenty-one, after finding herself mother to four small children.

Suddenly Berry was forced to make one of the most agonizing decisions of her young years-–the only one that would save her life and preserve her sanity. For women who have faced these problems and prayed for a way out, or know a loved one who has–-this is a must read!

* * * *

My next book, Guilt by Matrimony, about the murder of Aspen socialite, Nancy Pfister, comes out November 17. My memoir, Sister of Silence, is about surviving domestic violence and how journalism helped free me; Cheatin’ Ain’t Easy, now in ebook format, is about the life of Preston County native, Eloise Morgan Milne; The Savage Murder of Skylar Neese (a New York Times bestseller, with coauthor Geoff Fuller) and Pretty Little Killers (also with Fuller), released July 8, 2014, and featured in the August 18 issue of People Magazine.

You can find these books either online or in print at a bookstore near you, at BenBella Books, Nellie Bly Books, Amazon, on iTunes and Barnes and Noble.

For an in-depth look at the damaging effects of the silence that surrounds abuse, please watch my live TEDx talk, given April 13, 2013, at Connecticut College.

Have a great day and remember, it’s whatever you want to make it!

~Daleen

Editor’s Note: Daleen Berry is a New York Times best-selling author and a recipient of the Pearl Buck Award in Writing for Social Change. She has won several other awards, for investigative journalism and her weekly newspaper columns, and her memoir, Sister of Silence, placed first in the West Virginia Writers’ Competition. Ms. Berry speaks about overcoming abuse through awareness, empowerment and goal attainment at conferences around the country. To read an excerpt of her memoir, please go to the Sister of Silence site. Check out the five-star review from ForeWord Reviews. Or find out why Kirkus Reviews called Ms. Berry “an engaging writer, her style fluid and easy to read, with welcome touches of humor and sustained tension throughout.”

How Doctors Can Help

Domestic Violence and Human Rights
Did you know

  • In just two minutes, you can change her life in a profound way?
  • If you don’t listen, she may never speak up again?
  • You may be the only lifeline she has?

Dr. Jane Schaller came back a different person from war-torn South Africa in 1985. Her experience led to Physicians for Human Rights, a Boston-based group that believes health professionals have a great moral and ethical influence on human rights issues. Schaller, who has documented the effects of war on children, as quoted in the Journal of the American Medical Women’s Association (Vol. 52, 1997), says:

“It is true that one doctor cannot end a tyranny, make all children well or end all torture used against innocent human beings. But one physician can make some difference, and a group of physicians or other health professionals can make a great deal of difference…”


In this country, there is another war going in, one in which many, many women and children are victims.

Continue reading “How Doctors Can Help”

About Daleen

Daleen Berry is an award-winning author, editor, investigative journalist and public speaker. She has been a journalist since 1979, when she began reporting while still in high school. Berry was selected as her high school’s correspondent, and assigned to write for two local newspapers she later went to work for, The Preston County Journal/News and The Dominion Post. In 1990, Berry received a first-place for investigative journalism from the West Virginia Press Association while reporting for The Preston County Journal/News.
In that time, she has written more than 1,800 articles for newspapers, magazines, and newsletters. Many of those articles dealt with domestic violence. This included preventative measures, criminal court trials of husbands who killed their wives, rape and domestic violence campaigns, and child sexual abuse.

In June 2006, her memoir took first place in the “Appalachian Theme” category of the West Virginia Writers’ Competition. In May 2005, she won second place in the M.M. Neely Persuasive Speaking Competition, at Fairmont State University, for her speech regarding child sexual abuse and its link to domestic violence. Berry also served as editor of The Columns, FSU’s student-run newspaper, during the Fall 2004 semester, where she is majoring in business management. While serving as editor, Berry led her staff to a record number of awards in the Society of Collegiate Journalists’ annual competition.

In 1991, Berry was editor-in-chief of publications she wrote and published for the West Virginia Deputy Sheriffs’ Association and the West Virginia Fraternal Order of Police. That freelance work led to increased exposure and knowledge about sexual molestation and domestic violence. From there, she met and interviewed officers from the FBI, and city, county and state officers from all over the country.

Berry has reported and edited many newspapers during her long career, including The Charleston Gazette, The Bridgeport News, The Clarksburg Exponent, The Dominion Post, The Tracy Press, The Preston County Journal/News, and The Kingsville Record. She was also a stringer for The Associated Press.

* * * *

My next book, Guilt by Matrimony, about the murder of Aspen socialite, Nancy Pfister, comes out November 17. My memoir, Sister of Silence, is about surviving domestic violence and how journalism helped free me; Cheatin’ Ain’t Easy, now in ebook format, is about the life of Preston County native, Eloise Morgan Milne; The Savage Murder of Skylar Neese (a New York Times bestseller, with coauthor Geoff Fuller) and Pretty Little Killers (also with Fuller), released July 8, 2014, and featured in the August 18 issue of People Magazine.

You can find these books either online or in print at a bookstore near you, at BenBella Books, Nellie Bly Books, Amazon, on iTunes and Barnes and Noble.

For an in-depth look at the damaging effects of the silence that surrounds abuse, please watch my live TEDx talk, given April 13, 2013, at Connecticut College.

Have a great day and remember, it’s whatever you want to make it!

~Daleen

Editor’s Note: Daleen Berry is a New York Times best-selling author and a recipient of the Pearl Buck Award in Writing for Social Change. She has won several other awards, for investigative journalism and her weekly newspaper columns, and her memoir, Sister of Silence, placed first in the West Virginia Writers’ Competition. Ms. Berry speaks about overcoming abuse through awareness, empowerment and goal attainment at conferences around the country. To read an excerpt of her memoir, please go to the Sister of Silence site. Check out the five-star review from ForeWord Reviews. Or find out why Kirkus Reviews called Ms. Berry “an engaging writer, her style fluid and easy to read, with welcome touches of humor and sustained tension throughout.”